Resources to Help us Evaluate Research

Neuroscience and Conflict Resolution Blog by Stephanie West Allen

As neuro-foolishness and psych-silliness continue to seep into both mainstream media and mediation presentations, resources to help us be discerning users of neuroscience and psychology are needed more and more. In the past, I have recommended some resources to increase discernment when reading press releases or encountering news from the mass media or even reading research papers. For example, I urge people to read Psychology’s Ghosts: The Crisis in the Profession and the Way Back and The Five Percent: Finding Solutions to Seemingly Impossible Conflicts.

Recently I saw a Tweet swim by on my stream recommending some research and thought that the studies did not sound very credible and certainly not of much help outside of the environment in which the research was conducted. I asked one of my colleagues, a cognitive psychologist, about the research and he too was skeptical, mentioning demand characteristics as one reason for his skepticism.

For those of us citing or applying research in our work and presentations, a knowledge of that phenomenon and other possible effects of the researcher’s expectations is wise, probably essential. To increase that knowledge, here are two quick overviews: “Interpersonal Expectancy Effects: A 30-Year Perspective” (Current Directions of the American Psychological Society) and the Wikipedia page on demand characteristics. Enjoy learning or reviewing.

The more we know, the more quickly we can cull out, blog about, Tweet, and use in practice only that which is likely to be useful to facilitating the resolution of conflict, understanding behavior, and serving clients.

– See more at: http://westallen.typepad.com/brains_on_purpose/2013/08/some-more-resources-to-help-us-evaluate-research-and-thus-be-credible.html#sthash.oXoHNaSb.dpuf

                        author

Stephanie West Allen

Stephanie West Allen, JD, practiced law in California for several years, held offices in local bar associations, and wrote chapters for California Continuing Education of the Bar. While in CA, Stephanie completed several five-day mediation training programs with the Center for Mediation in Law, as well as a two-year intensive… MORE >

Featured Mediators

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

Gail Bingham: Future Environmental Policy Mediators – Video

Gail Bingham shares her views on how up-and-coming mediators should start mediating from the very beginning, involving all the parties in an assessment or diagnosis of the dispute.

By Gail Bingham
Category

Lincoln, Bill: Mediators Not Neutral, But Impartial – Video

Bill Lincoln explains how he doesn't see mediators as being neutral, but sees them as having a duty to facilitate a process and be impartial.

By Bill Lincoln
Category

Niche Marketing you say?

From the blog Mediation Marketing TipsI get really thrilled when people I know prepare a plan and then take the plunge into the mediation and arbitration ADR world. I am...

By Kristina Haymes

Find a Mediator

X
X
X