Poor Behavior 7: Rushing in to Fix Things

Rushing in with a super-hero cape and special powers to fix whatever is ailing a project could result in the wrong problem being fixed while the real issue is tied to the railroad tracks with a steam engine barreling in its direction.

Welcome to #7 in the list of the Dirty Dozen Behaviors that Cause Problems at Work.

Today’s employers want staff who are problem-solvers. Knowing that, you may have a tendency to want to jump in and fix something just so you can tell him about all the troubles you’ve averted. If you rush in too quickly, though, you could make matters worse.

Taking a few minutes to ask some clarifying questions may be all it takes to understand the scope and depth of a problem. The way in which you ask those questions matters in terms of enflaming or calming those around you. Try to refrain from using any words, body language, or tone that can come across as accusatory or critical while you’re exploring all aspects of the event. You’ll probably be tempted to ask “why” a lot so practice saying, “So, you did this because….” and then let the person finish the sentence. I understand it’s really a “why” question in disguise but it’s an easier one to respond to.

Once you’ve explored the situation start eliciting ideas for a solution. Get more than your initial idea on the table; yours may still be the best answer but having a number of possible resolutions allows for a strategic response versus something that may be seen as knee-jerk if it doesn’t work out.

To help others avoid rushing in to fix things when you bring a problem, be prepared with three solutions so the other person knows that you understand the scope and depth of the issue and that you’ve given serious thought about to how to fix it. Only one idea makes you sound positional, two can come across as “either/or”, but three opens the door for discussion and, like I said, demonstrates that you understand what’s happening.

When should you apply these strategies? Of course, if there’s a fire blazing in the hallway, by all means get the extinguisher and put it out. However, learning that the date was left off the VIP invitation to the big seminar lends itself to at least a short discussion.

                        author

Vivian Scott

Vivian Scott is a Professional Certified Mediator and the author of Conflict Resolution at Work For Dummies.  She spent many years in the competitive and often stress-filled world of high tech marketing where she realized resolving conflict within the confines of office politics was paramount to success.  Through creative solutions… MORE >

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