Philip Moses

Philip Moses

Philip S. Moses serves as CADRE's Assistant Director. As Assistant Director, Philip manages CADRE's use of advanced technology as well as traditional means to provide technical assistance to state departments of education in order to improve the effectiveness of special education mediation systems. He also supports parents, educators, administrators, attorneys and advocates to benefit from the full continuum of dispute resolution options that can prevent and resolve conflict. Since 1987, Philip has mediated, case managed, and observed thousands of mediations under the auspices of the New York State Unified Court System, as well as in the public, private, and not-for-profit sectors. Philip was formerly Coordinator of the Program on Public Policy Dispute Resolution at the Government Law Center of Albany Law School. He was also an Adjunct Faculty member of Albany Law School teaching courses on mediation and alternative dispute resolution, and served as an adjunct faculty member for Siena College's Peace Studies Program. Philip served as President of the New York State Dispute Resolution Association from 1995 - 1997. Formerly the director of the Dispute Resolution Center of Onondaga County, he also founded the Institute for Advanced Conflict Resolution Skills based in Syracuse. Philip co-founded the Campus Mediation Center at Syracuse University where he completed a Masters degree with a Certificate in Conflict Resolution. He is a certified mediator and certified trainer for the New York State Unified Court System's Community Dispute Resolution Centers program, and holds several others certificates in the field.

Philip has consulted, conducted training workshops and giving presentations to a variety of national and state-based organizations and agencies including the Technical Assistance Alliance of Parent Centers; the National Early Childhood Technical Assistance System; the National Association of State Directors of Special Education; the National Association of Mediation in Education; the National Conference on Peacemaking and Conflict Resolution; the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution; the Council of State Governments; the Internal Revenue Service; the U.S. Department of Education; the Federal Highway Administration; the Oregon Dispute Resolution Commission; the Colorado, Mississippi, and North Dakota Parent Training and Information Centers; the New York State Office of Vocational and Educational Services for Individuals with Disabilities; the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation; the New York State Public Service Commission; the New York Planning Federation; the Public Service Workshops Program of Rockefeller College, State University of New York; the New York State Dispute Resolution Association; the New York State Unified Court System; and the Heartland Mediators Association based in Kansas City.

Philip Moses has been a professional mediator, trainer, and consultant in the field of conflict resolution since 1983. He has consulted with a wide variety of clients throughout the United States including governmental agencies, educational institutions, religious organizations, not-for-profit services, for-profit corporations, and arts groups. He has also taught courses and lectured at a number of colleges and universities throughout the United States.

Philip chaired The First National Symposium on Dispute Resolution in Special Education which convened in Washington, D.C., November 2000; Beyond Mediation: The Second National Symposium on Dispute Resolution in Special Education which convened in Washington, D.C., November 2002; Moving Upstream: The Third National Symposium on Dispute Resolution in Special Education which also convened in Washinton, D.C., December 20004; the 8th New York State National Conference on Dispute Resolution hosted by the Government Law Center of Albany Law School in Saratoga Springs, New York, October of 1996, and "Dispute Resolution and the Public Sector: Building Bridges to the Future" held at Albany Law School, March 1998.




Contact Philip Moses

Website: www.directionservice.org/cadre

Articles and Video:

From Phil Moses (10/14/13)
CADRE, the National Center on Appropriate Dispute Resolution in Special Education provides technical assistance to all 50 states and the 10 territories working to increase the nation’s capacity to effectively resolve special education disputes and reducing the use of expensive adversarial processes. While are resources are limited, our footprint is large. Thus, we need to use technology in order to efficiently reach across so many time zones and to so many varied constituents. For 15 years now, the folks at Resourceful Internet Solutions and their flagship website, mediate.com, has enabled us to do this very effectively. I can’t imagine our web presence could be any better than it is and for this we are very grateful.

From Phil Moses (08/30/07)
While the field of mediation has grown, diversified, and specialized over the last decade, one constant has been mediate.com’s ever expanding presence and voice. No other online entity has done more to promote collaborative approaches to resolving conflicts than the folks at Resourceful Internet Solutions and their flagship website, mediate.com. Perhaps more important than promotion of the field, mediate.com has helped create a real community of dispute resolution professionals. With one click, I instantly see photos and new commentary from friends and colleagues. Mediate.com has helped build a strong foundation for mediation and much, much more.

Encouraging the Use of Mediation by Families from Diverse Backgrounds (12/06/01)
School systems and families sometimes have different perspectives about the education of children with disabilities. When a family files for a due process hearing, the Individuals with Disabilities Act (IDEA), Amendments of 1997 [P.L. 105-17] requires state departments of education to provide access to mediation to help resolve these differences. For some families mediation is a viable and relatively easily understood process. For many families, however, mediation is an unknown process and may seem inaccessible or unattractive.