Arline Kardasis

Arline Kardasis

Arline Kardasis is a mediator, trainer and founding partner of Elder Decisions and Agreement Resources, LLC.  She mediates family disputes in the areas of eldercare and estate matters as well as divorce. Arline has delivered workshops, seminars and trainings in a broad spectrum of settings, including: the National Association of Geriatric Care Managers, the Northeast Human Resources Association, the Association for Conflict Resolution International-Family Section, and the New Hampshire Conflict Resolution Association. She has presented to doctoral candidates in gerontology at the University of Massachusetts in Boston and has trained eldercare professionals from throughout New England.  Arline mediates civil disputes for the Boston Bar Association Boston Municipal Court Program and she is on several divorce mediation panels.  She has written about family mediation for Mediate.com and, with Rikk Larsen, she co-wrote “When Aging Issues Lead to Family Conflict” for Massachusetts Lawyers Weekly.

Arline is Vice-President of the New England Chapter of the Association for Conflict Resolution and is the former Newsletter Editor. She is a member of the Massachusetts Council on Family Mediation and serves on the Public Awareness Subcommittee for the Massachusetts Trial Court’s Standing Committee on Dispute Resolution. Arline was trained at Harvard Law School Program on Negotiation and by the Center for Social Gerontology and she has received extensive advanced trainings in elder, divorce, and employment mediation.  She received her BA in Political Science and Urban Studies from Boston University and her MAT with honors from Simmons College.




Contact Arline Kardasis

Website: www.elderdecisions.org

Articles and Video:

Elder Decisions in Elder Mediation (11/01/04)
Elder mediation brings family members and professionals together to address the major life changes inherent in the aging process. In these mediations, the issues most families raise involve housing transitions, financial control, and new and difficult conversations between parents and adult children. Through skillful mediation, seniors and their families can gain control of what is important to them and protect family relationships in the process.