Daniel Dana

Daniel Dana

Holding the Ph.D. in psychology, Dan Dana served for several years as a professor of organizational behavior at the University of Hartford (Connecticut) Graduate School of Business, and has held faculty appointments at Syracuse University and several other institutions. (A former student once called him "Doctor Conflict," and the moniker stuck!)

As the founder and managing director of the Mediation Training Institute International, Dr. Dana seeks to expand global awareness and use of non-adversarial methods for managing human differences – in the workplace and beyond. He is the author of Managing Differences, the sourcebook of MTI’s seminars — published worldwide in six languages — and Conflict Resolution: Mediation Tools for Everyday Worklife, a featured book in the McGraw-Hill Briefcase Books series.




Contact Daniel Dana

Website: www.mediationworks.com

Articles and Video:

Integrating Conflict Management and Workplace Mediation Practices: A Blueprint for Future Practice (02/03/15)
A key motive for closer integration between workplace mediation and conflict management processes is the desire of organizational clients to control costs. In a manner similar to the evolution from litigation to alternative dispute resolution, organizations are increasingly recognizing the advantages of improved ability of managers and employees to manage their conflicts at the lowest possible level and at the earliest possible time.

From Dan Dana (08/30/07)
Jim, congratulations on the occasion of Mediate.com's 200th newsletter for establishing Mediate.com as the world's leading resource for mediators and others seeking information about what mediators do. You and the "Johns" (Helie and Ford) are true pioneers in the Internet age. I look forward to receiving your next 200 newsletters!

What's a Conflict? (08/27/01)
Workplaces are changing. As interpersonal rules of conduct become looser and time deadlines become tighter, conflict resolution is gaining importance as a strategic management issue. 'Conflict Resolution'provides specific mediation skills and managerial tools for successfully preventing, managing, and resolving workplace conflicts. Read the first chapter online.

Managing Cultural Differences (12/04/00)
Simply informing members of today's organizations about cultural differences is an incomplete strategy for helping workmates bridge the gaps that impair cooperative work. To achieve maximum benefit, information should be supplemented with behaviorally specific skills or "tools" that equip trainees with practical techniques for solving workplace problems that derive from culture-based differences.