Anthony Daimsis

Anthony Daimsis

Anthony Daimsis has been teaching at the University of Ottawa since 2003. He is the current Director of the National Program, a program that leads to a dual JD/LL.L degree. He is also the Director of the common law's mooting program. Prof. Daimsis teaches Contracts and Torts law, International Sales law, International Commercial Arbitration, ADR and legal writing. He also supervises the common law Jessup, Vis and FDI moot teams and serves as the faculty's moot program director.  He has advised South Asian countries in the area of Foreign investment and investment treaties. Prof. Daimsis is called to the Ontario Bar (Barrister and Solicitor). He has recently joined Littleton Chambers (London, England) as an associate door tenant. He works with the National Judicial Institute, a not-for-profit institution committed to building better justice through leadership in the education of judges in Canada and internationally. Before teaching at the university, he worked at an international law firm located in Austria, as an associate. His work focused on foreign investment disputes, telecommunications and underground resources, in addition to a number of international commercial contract and construction disputes resolved under the auspices of the World Bank (ICSID) and various international commercial arbitration institutions. As a leading authority in his field, Prof. Daimsis is frequently approached to serve as an arbitrator in domestic and international commercial disputes and is a sought after speaker on the topics of international arbitration and international sales law, most recently travelling to Myanmar to advise its government entities on investment into Myanmar.  He is on the ICDR panel of international arbitrators.




Contact Anthony Daimsis

Website: uOttawa.ca

Articles and Video:

Arbitration Conversation No. 19: Prof. Anthony Daimsis of the University of Ottawa (08/26/20)
In this episode of The Arbitration Conversation Amy interviews Prof. Anthony Daimsis of the University of Ottawa on the Uber case in Canada and unconscionability applied to the arbitration clause at issue.