Paul Rajkowski

Paul Rajkowski

Paul Rajkowski was born and raised in the Chicago area. After serving in the USAF, he graduated from St. Mary’s University of MN in 1967. Paul went to work in the printing industry as a sales representative in the printing ink division of a national company, eventually earning a sales manager position. Several years later, Paul bought his own printing company. In 1986, Paul had an opportunity to change industries and moved south to Tennessee to manage the production and sales of framed mirrors to the furniture industry.

During a personal court process, Paul learned about mediation. Intrigued, he took several courses in mediation, becoming a Rule 31 Tennessee listed mediator and mediation trainer. After ten years of training and mediating, also judging mediation competitions at university, Paul retired so that he and his wife can travel. Mediations still on his mind, though, and he is on a mission to keep alive the original concept of mediation as he understands it. In that quest, he has written several articles and intends to keep writing.




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Articles and Video:

One Size Does Not Fit All - And the War Within (02/15/19)
In the mediation world we get trained and know that “neutral“ is the role for the mediator.

Responsibility in Mediation: Who has it? - Part 2 (06/14/18)
I love mediation because parties get to probe, understand, make choices, create options and arrive at mutual decisions, saying how they feel about this conflict.

Responsibility in Mediation: Who has it? (06/07/18)
Mediation is a wonderful process and I love mediation but I do not want to see it get more complicated with “what mediators need to do” kinds of stuff.

Accommodator? No, How About "Invisible"? (01/19/18)
People are often looking for a chance to debate, yet mediators push them into separate sessions.

Is It Time? (06/30/17)
Is it time for us to change the designation: Mediator to Accommodator?

Shameful Performance (09/23/16)
Mediation, which is intended to be a neutral performance by a mediator, is slowly sliding into a performance by a mediator that is anything but neutral. Current mediation processes defined by lawyers are more courtroom than collaborative.