Lesley Allport

Lesley Allport

Lesley Allport is CMP Resolutions’ Head of Mediation and joined us in 2007. Her role includes supervising our team of practitioners; delivering dispute resolution services and training: developing best practice; and developing advanced mediation practice and mediation supervision programmes. She has worked in the field of mediation as a mediator, trainer and consultant for over 20 years. She delivered foundation family mediation training for over ten years and in 2002 she helped to establish mediation practice in the context of Special Educational Needs and Disability Conciliation. In 2005 she successfully completed the European Masters Degree in Mediation run by IUKB, Geneva, researching supervision practice in mediation across Europe and UK and developing a model of supervision specific to mediation. Currently she is a Governor of the College of Mediators. Lesley has a 100% record of getting disputants to mediation; and is consistently highly evaluated by clients, trainees and parties.




Contact Lesley Allport

Website: www.cmpresolutions.co.uk

Articles and Video:

Never Make Assumptions About Colleagues (09/28/18)
Whenever it comes to other people, our prejudices – and a pretty basic lack of knowledge – are what tend to rule.

Good Practice Framework (04/17/15)
Universities should include mediation in their framework for handling student complaints! The formal process is long, complex and saps everyone’s time and energy; most students with complaints about staff behaviours and attitude would prefer to talk it out, in our experience.

Why Introduce Internal Mediation Services Into Unionised Organisations? (01/10/11)
Mediation is another tool to be added to the kit that can help both Union Reps and HR staff alike to achieve these broader aims, as well as address specific disputes with speed, effectiveness and at low cost.

The Need For In-House Mediation Supervisors (06/28/10)
At CMP Resolutions we recognise the crucial, complex role of the Mediation Supervisor. Our unique training programme explores the multi functional nature of this position; from supporting mediators to grow and develop through reflection on their experience, to taking organisational responsibility ensuring the delivery of high quality, consistent practice.

Mediators, More Than Anybody, Should Know The Benefits Of Compromise” – Or Should They? (05/17/10)
These were words spoken in the context of promoting mediation within court settings in the face of a lack of education about mediation on the part of judges and, surprisingly (?), a lack of enthusiasm on the part of lawyers! The speaker outlined the difficulty there will be in achieving a culture change whereby mediation becomes the default position and recourse to litigation becomes the alternative. Mediators, he continued, will need to ‘give and take’, in order to establish mediation in the Courts. But where is the compromise in mediation? If it is simply about ‘cutting a deal’ or ‘settling for less’ maybe there is some validity in the notion – and maybe this is true for some models of mediation.