No Sour Grapes in this Conflict

Conflict Remedy Blog by Lorraine Segal

What would you do if someone secretly took grapes from your garden? Would you get mad? Feel like a victim? Blame the neighbors and call them thieves? Put up a fence to protect your property? Post angry warning signs?

All of those are common understandable responses, but they tend to perpetuate a conflict and often lead to escalation and feuding as neighbors defend themselves, counterattack, and blame. Instead, one young woman, Elly Hartshorn took a creative and much more peaceful approach.

Elly Hartshorn started a non profit educationally oriented vineyard in a community garden in one of the city’s poorer areas. It is all run by volunteers, with the purpose of “educating urban people about the realities of wine and grape growing.” The whole project sounds worthwhile, but what caught my attention, and touched my heart, was a conflict they had and how beautifully it was resolved.

Disappearing Grapes

After the Pinot Noir grapes began to grow on their plot, Elly and her volunteers noticed that grape bunches were repeatedly disappearing. Rather than being outraged, or putting up fences to protect the grapes, Hartshorn decided to “plant vines for table grapes near the garden’s perimeter, which the local residents could easily pick.”

Harmony instead of conflict.

What an elegant solution! Instead of creating an “us vs. them” hostility, she understood the needs of the low income residents, who wanted fresh grapes to eat. She provided that and preserved the wine grapes. She built good will instead of barriers.

The same approach works with organizations.

I encourage and guide  the organizational and corporate managers and HR professionals I work with to follow the same kind of process with their supervisors, co-workers, employees:

  • Examine their own (negative) assumptions about the situation and person.
  • Look at the situation from another’s perspective.
  • Engage in creative problem solving that might dissolve conflict and create a positive environment where everyone can get their needs met.

When we can do this, we can all enjoy the sweet fruits of harmony!

Quotes are from the article Wine Country in the City by Jon Bonné —SF Chronicle 8-2-15.

                        author

Lorraine Segal

Lorraine Segal, M.A. is a Conflict Management and Communication Consultant, Coach, and Trainer. Through her own business, Conflict Remedy, Ms. Segal works with corporations and non-profits as well as governmental entities and individuals to promote harmonious and productive workplaces.  She is a consultant and trainer for County of Sonoma. And, at Sonoma… MORE >

Featured Mediators

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

Time Management For Busy People

I know you're busy. But are you productive? That's the question I've been asking myself lately. I'm really consumed with meeting my goals for this year, and just saying yes...

By Dina Beach Lynch
Category

A Case Against Advice Giving

At the recent Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) conference in Orlando, a panel member in a well attended workshop commented, “We are all guilty of giving advice”, to which many...

By Alice Estey, Sandi Adams
Category

The Mediator as Moral Witness

This article is also available at the Harvard Negotiation Law Review site, where it was originally published in March 2013.This complete article is attached as a PDF file below. People...

By David Hoffman

Find a Mediator

X
X
X