Interest-Based Negotiations: A Quick List of Preparation Questions

I’ve linked to Negotiating:  Thinking it Through from the Business Growth Blog before, but haven’t quoted the Eight Preparation Questions listed there.  The more I mediate (yes, one’s practice does grow) the more I’m reminded that litigators resist interest-based bargaining techniques.

I get stuck in position-based negotiations as well.  It remains a challenge for me, after 25 years of litigation practice, not to be sucked into the attorneys’ arguments about why they are right.  To help all of us in the mediation room . . .

[h]ere is a list of 8 questions you can ask yourself when you suddenly realize that you have to prepare for a negotiation. Use these to generate quick preparation for any negotiation.

1. What are my intended outcomes and interests?

This is about having your goal in mind but also about thinking about the bigger picture at the same time – if you’re goal is to get to work on time, speeding to get there might seem like the right choice until the cop pulls you over.

2. What are their possible interests and outcomes?

Look at the negotiaion from their point of view. What do they really want from this?

3. What are some of the options of agreement?

Where are the points of agreement? Focusing on this beforehand will set a tone of reaching agreement rather than a tone of conflict.

4. What is my Plan B?

Once you’ve thought through the first three questions, what’s your fall back position? Having your Plan B in mind gives you a feeling of options so if the deal goes to far against you, you are comfortable with your option B.

5. What is my worst case scenario?

Answering this question sets your “don’t cross” line. You’ve predetermined what you’re willing to give up and more than that is a deal breaker… that means you can negotiate confidently, since you know your direction.

6. What are some possible external standards?

External standard are outside measures that can move the negotiation away from personal stakes to measures from an outside authority. Examples might be interest rates, rate of exchange or time frame.

7. What is or are my reserve price / terms / limits?

Knowing what your limits are and then not not going past them results in more useful and enjoyable negotiation.

8. What is my game plan?

Map it out. What do you want and how are you going to get there?

                        author

Victoria Pynchon

Attorney-mediator Victoria Pynchon is a panelist with ADR Services, Inc. Ms. Pynchon was awarded her LL.M Degree in Dispute Resolution from the Straus Institute in May of 2006, after 25 years of complex commercial litigation practice, with sub-specialties in intellectual property, securities fraud, antitrust, insurance coverage, consumer class actions and all… MORE >

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