Great Conflict Resolution Starts With Great Problem Finding

Tammy Lenski’s Conflict Zen Blog

A group of students at the Art Institute of Chicago approached two large tables holding 27 random objects.

They’d been asked to select some objects and draw a still life. Some examined just a few items, selected ones that interested them, and got right down to drawing. Others handled more of the objects, turning them over many times before selecting the ones that interested them. They rearranged their chosen objects several times and took longer to complete the assigned still life.

Two University of Chicago social scientists were watching. Jacob Getzels and Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi (whose renowned book Flow I’ve used in my grad courses over the years) then asked a panel of art experts to evaluate the resulting works without telling them the source of the drawings or anything about the study they were conducting.

The results were intriguing. The art experts judged the second group’s work as far more creative than the first group’s work. What’s more, in follow-ups about 5 years and 18 years after the study, those who’d taken the second approach were more likely to remain artists and have had success in the art world.

What differentiated the first group from the second? Csikszentmihalyi characterized the first group of students as problem solvers who were asking themselves, “How can I produce a good drawing?” He characterized the second group as problem finders who were asking themselves, “What good drawing can I produce?” Said Getzels, “The quality of the problem that is found is a forerunner of the quality of the solution that is attained.”

It’s true in conflict resolution, too. Creative conflict problem solving doesn’t start with the question, “How can we resolve this conflict?” It starts with the question, “How can we find a good solution together?”

It starts with questions like, “How is the way we’re framing this problem limiting the solutions available to us?” and “What are other interesting ways we can frame the problem we’re trying to resolve?” and “How can we re-frame this problem as an opportunity?”

Great conflict resolution starts with great problem finding.

[HT to Dan Pink’s book To Sell Is Human: The Surprising Truth About Moving Others for the Getzels and Csikszentmihalyi story.]

                        author

Tammy Lenski

Dr. Tammy Lenski helps individuals, pairs, teams, and audiences navigate disagreement better, address friction, and build alignment. Her current work centers on creating the conditions for robust collaboration and sound decisions while fostering resilient personal and professional relationships. Her conflict resolution podcast and blog, Disagree Better, are available at https://tammylenski.com/archives/… MORE >

Featured Mediators

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

ADR Considered an Active Practice in Federal Courts

JAMS ADR Blog by Chris PooleMore than one-third of all federal trial courts authorize multiple forms of ADR and all federal courts authorize some form of ADR, according to a...

By Chris Poole
Category

Fortune Cookies And Conflict Management: A Dilemma

Fortune cookies have become a basic dessert course of Chinese cuisine in Northern American countries. It is amazing that inside these little cookies are such profound messages inspiring us about...

By Kin I (Deane) Lam
Category

Making Settlements Last

A settlement is meaningless if it the parties don't respect it. Parties who don't respect settlements simply see breach as another cost of doing business, accepting further litigation if they...

By Alec Wisner

Find a Mediator

X
X
X