Pratik Shah

Pratik Shah

Pratik Shah briefs and argues cases in federal and state appellate courts across the country, including the U.S. Supreme Court. Pratik also provides strategic advice to clients at all stages of constitutional, regulatory and other complex litigation.

 

Leading publications describe Pratik as:

 

  • “Absolutely brilliant” and “the complete package: an extremely gifted writer and an extremely effective oral advocate,” Chambers USA.
  • “Supremely talented” and having “a knack for boiling down complex cases to their essence and advocating for his clients in a calm, clear and compelling way,” The Legal 500.
  • A top appellate advocate who has successfully “practiced before the highest court in the land on some of the most groundbreaking cases of the 21stcentury,” Washington Business Journal.

Under Pratik’s leadership, Akin Gump has been a mainstay on the National Law Journal’s Appellate Hot List, named one of the top three appellate practices in the 2017 Best of Corporate Counselrankings, and recognized asLaw360’s 2019 Practice Group of the Year.

Before joining the firm, Pratik served for more than five years as an Assistant to the Solicitor General at the DOJ. He received a number of awards for his advocacy before the Supreme Court during that time, including the Attorney General’s Distinguished Service Award for his role as the lead drafter of the successful challenge to the Defense of Marriage Act inUnited States v. Windsor.

Prior to his work at the DOJ, Pratik worked in the appellate practice of another international law firm, taught constitutional law, and clerked for Justice Stephen G. Breyer on the U.S. Supreme Court and Judge William A. Fletcher on the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9thCircuit.




Contact Pratik Shah

Website: https://www.akingump.com/en/lawyers-advisors/pratik-a-shah.html

Articles and Video:

Conflicting Decisions Under 28 U.S.C. § 1782: How Should International Commercial Arbitration Deal With the Shifting Landscape? (12/21/20)
On December 7, 2020, parties and practitioners in international commercial arbitration came one step closer to resolving the threshold question of the applicability of 28 U.S.C. § 1782 to international commercial tribunals.