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<xTITLE>Wallace Warfield, George Mason Professor and Conflict Resolution Expert Dies at 71</xTITLE>

Wallace Warfield, George Mason Professor and Conflict Resolution Expert Dies at 71

August 2010 Wallace Warfield
From the Washington Post - August 26, 2010

Wallace Warfield, George Mason professor and conflict resolution expert, dies at 71

Wallace Warfield, 71, a George Mason University professor who was an internationally recognized authority on conflict resolution, died Aug. 21 at Holy Cross Hospital in Silver Spring. He had complications from Parkinson's disease and liver cancer.

In 1990, Dr. Warfield was a co-founder of the Conflict Clinic at GMU's Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution. After the clinic closed in 1994, he continued to teach at the university until May.

Dr. Warfield was a specialist in resolving intergroup conflicts at the community, national and international levels. He had considerable experience in studying and mediating disputes involving racial and ethnic conflict.

In addition to teaching conflict analysis and resolution at GMU, Dr. Warfield published widely on the topic and was on the editorial board of a leading professional journal in the field, Negotiation Journal. He was president of the Society of Professionals in Dispute Resolution and served on other professional boards.

He led training programs for government officials and participated in conflict mediation efforts in the United States, Europe, Africa and South America.

Wallace Pinn Warfield was born in New York City and was a graduate of Howard University. He received a master's degree in public administration in 1962 from a D.C.-based program of the University of Southern California. He received a doctorate in public policy from George Mason in 2000.

In the 1960s, Dr. Warfield worked for a youth services agency in New York City to resolve disputes among street gangs. From 1968 to 1988, he worked for the Justice Department's Community Relations Service in New York, first as a mediator and later as a regional director and acting director.

He came to Washington in the late 1980s as a visiting fellow to develop dispute-resolution processes for federal agencies. He lived in Silver Spring.

In 2009, Dr. Warfield received a lifetime achievement award from the Association for Conflict Resolution.