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<xTITLE>Invisible Rules and Conflict</xTITLE>

Invisible Rules and Conflict

by Lorraine Segal
April 2022 Lorraine Segal

Invisible rules can lead to conflict.

Are you unconsciously expecting other people to automatically follow your invisible rules? If so, you may be setting yourself up for unnecessary conflicts.

Several years ago, I read a book about forgiveness by Fred Luskin. He has a section in the book about “unenforceable rules”, which I found extremely helpful for dealing with resentments and conflict. Recently, I read an article by Tammy Lenski about a similar phenomena, which she calls “ghost rules”.

What are ghost or unenforceable rules? These are unspoken rules we learned in our families or early workplaces that we have never examined, but which we believe are unquestionably right not only for ourselves but others as well. These represent our fervent opinion about the way people should behave, and the way the universe should operate. A corollary to the rule is that we feel free to judge and criticize others if they don’t follow them. Almost all of us have rules like this, but the problem is that our invisible rule set and that of other people, are not necessarily the same!

Why do these invisible rules create conflict?

Most conflicts occur when we misunderstand each other or make (negative) assumptions about the motivation, integrity, or ability of others. If we are operating from a different set of unspoken commandments, these communication clashes are more likely.

So how do you escape from the trap of invisible rules?

  • Start bringing your own rules to conscious awareness.
  • Once you understand your rules, accept that yours are not universal.
  • Assume that other people’s rules may be different from yours.
  • Don’t assume bad intentions because they didn’t follow yours.
  • Asking yourself curious, open questions can help.
    • Why am I getting irritated and “judgy” right now?
    • Did this other person or the situation break one of my unconscious rules?
    • What is the rule operating here? Does my rule make sense in this context?
    • Are they operating by the same rule? If not, what might their invisible rule be? 

And most important of all, how can you gently explore these rules together, or leave them behind and have better, more loving communication?

Biography


Lorraine Segal, M.A. is a Conflict Management and Communication Consultant, Coach, and Trainer. Through her own business, Conflict Remedy, Ms. Segal works with corporations and non-profits as well as governmental entities and individuals to promote harmonious and productive workplaces. 

She is a consultant and trainer for County of Sonoma. And, at Sonoma State University, she is the curriculum designer and lead teacher for the new Conflict Management Certificate program. Ms. Segal was recently named one of the top 30 Conflict Resolution experts to follow on LinkedIn. She is also a contributing author to the forthcoming book, Stand Up, Speak Out Against Workplace Bullying.



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