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<xTITLE>Recent Study Shows Bad Workplace Apples Do Indeed Spoil the Barrel </xTITLE>

Recent Study Shows Bad Workplace Apples Do Indeed Spoil the Barrel

by Diane J. Levin
March 2007

From Online Guide to Mediation

Diane J. Levin
According to the results of a study reported in the journal Research in Organizational Behavior, bad apples really do spoil it for their co-workers. This will come as no surprise to anyone who has ever shared a workspace with a negative personality.

The study, conducted by Will Felps, a Ph.D. candidate in management and organizational behavior, Professor Terence R. Mitchell, and graduate student Eliza Byington, all from the University of Washington Business School, examines the ways in which the negative behavior of proverbial "bad apples" can wreak havoc on a workplace. Unsurprisingly, bad apples undermine creativity and problem-solving, stymie learning, escalate conflict, distract co-workers from their tasks, destroy trust, and produce a host of other ill effects that no organization can afford to ignore.

The study was inspired by the experience of Felps's wife with a bad apple in her own workplace:

Felps' wife was unhappy at work and characterized the environment as cold and unfriendly. Then, she said, a funny thing happened. One of her co-workers who was particularly caustic and was always making fun of other people at the office came down with an illness that caused him to be away for several days.

"And when he was gone, my wife said that the atmosphere of the office changed dramatically," Felps said. "People started helping each other, playing classical music on their radios, and going out for drinks after work. But when he returned to the office, things returned to the unpleasant way they were.

She hadn't noticed this employee as being a very important person in the office before he came down with this illness but, upon observing the social atmosphere when he was gone, she came to believe that he had a profound and negative impact. He truly was the "bad apple" that spoiled the barrel."

The study, "How, when, and why bad apples spoil the barrel: Negative group members and dysfunctional groups", is available (in PDF) at Will Felps's web page.

Biography


Diane Levin, J.D., is a mediator, dispute resolution trainer, negotiation coach, writer, and lawyer based in Marblehead, Massachusetts, who has instructed people from around the world in the art of talking it out. Since 1995 she has helped clients resolve disputes involving tort, employment, business, estate, family, and real property issues, and serves on numerous mediation panels, including the United States Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. Training and coaching are an enduring passion -- she has taught thousands of people to resolve conflict, negotiate better, or become mediators -- from Croatian judges to Fortune 500 executives.

 

A geek at heart, Levin consults on web design and social media to professionals.  She blogs about ADR at the intersection of law, science, and popular culture at the award-winning MediationChannel.com, regarded as one of the world's top ADR blogs.  She also tracks and catalogues ADR blogs world-wide at ADRblogs.com, where she has created a community for bloggers writing about constructive ways to resolve disputes.

 

web site: http://dianelevin.com



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