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<xTITLE>American Exceptionalism in Consumer Arbitration</xTITLE>

American Exceptionalism in Consumer Arbitration

by Amy Schmitz
May 2013

Disputing Blog by Karl Bayer, Victoria VanBuren, and Holly Hayes

Amy Schmitz

Amy Schmitz, Professor of Law at the University of Colorado Law School, has authored an interesting article entitled, American Exceptionalism in Consumer Arbitration, Loyola University Chicago International Law Review, Vol. 10, No. 1, 2013; U. of Colorado Law Legal Studies Research Paper No. 13-7. In her paper, Professor Schmitz describes business-to-consumer arbitration policy in the United States and the effect it may have on cross-border disputes.

Here is the abstract:

“American exceptionalism” has been used to reference the United States’ outlier policies in various contexts, including its love for litigation. Despite Americans’ reverence for their “day in court,” their zest for contractual freedom and efficiency has prevailed to result in U.S. courts’ strict enforcement of arbitration provisions in both business-to-business (“B2B”) and business-to-consumer (“B2C”) contracts. This is exceptional because although most of the world joins the United States in generally enforcing B2B arbitration under the New York Convention, many other countries refuse or strictly limit arbitration enforcement in B2C relationships due to concerns regarding power imbalances and public enforcement of consumer protections. The resulting clash in arbitration policy has left consumers in cross-border cases uncertain whether they must abide by arbitration clauses in an increasingly global marketplace.

This and other scholarly articles written by Professor Schmitz may be downloaded free of charge from the Social Science Research Network.

Biography


Professor Amy Schmitz joined the University of Missouri School of Law and the Center for Dispute Resolution as the Elwood L. Thomas Missouri Endowed Professor of Law in 2016. Previously she was a Professor at the University of Colorado School of Law for over 16 years. Prior to teaching, Professor Schmitz practiced law with large law firms in Seattle and Minneapolis, and served as a law clerk for the U. S. Court of Appeals for the 8th Circuit.  Professor Schmitz teaches courses in Contracts, Lawyering, Online Dispute Resolution (ODR), AI, Data Analytics and the Law, Arbitration, International Arbitration, and Consumer Law. She has been heavily involved in ODR teaching and research for a long time and is a Fellow of the National Center for Technology and Dispute Resolution, as well as the Co-Chair of the ABA Technology Committee of the Dispute Resolution Section and the ODR Task Force.  She serves on the Association of American Law Schools Executive Committee on Commercial and Consumer Law, was an External Scientific Fellow of the Max Planck Institute Luxembourg, and is a researcher with the ACT Project exploring AI and ODR. Professor Schmitz has published over 50 articles in law journals and books, and a book, The New Handshake: Online Dispute Resolution and the Future of Consumer Protection, with Colin Rule.



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