An Empirical Analysis of Collaborative Practice

Originally published in Family Court Review, Vol. 49, pp. 257-281, April 2011 – republished with permission

This article summarizes empirical research about Collaborative Practice, the Collaborative movement, its interaction with other parts of the dispute resolution field, and its impact on the field.


It reviews studies of Collaborative Practice describing the individuals involved in Collaborative cases, how the process works, the operation of local practice groups, and the impact of Collaborative Practice on legal practice generally. Based on this analysis, it suggests an agenda for future research. Finally, it offers suggestions for constructive development of the Collaborative field.

Attachments to this Article

                        author

John Lande

John Lande is the Isidor Loeb Professor Emeritus at the University of Missouri School of Law and former director of its LLM Program in Dispute Resolution.  He received his J.D. from Hastings College of Law and Ph.D in sociology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison.  He began mediating professionally in 1982 in California.… MORE >

Featured Mediators

ad
View all

Read these next

Category

Which System Would the Jury Use?

PGP Mediation Blog by Phyllis G. PollackIf you have been reading my blogs, you know that I am interested in neuroscience and the notion as discussed by Daniel Kahneman in...

By Phyllis Pollack
Category

Why is it Beneficial to Collaborate?

Litigation is an old-fashioned way to resolve disputes.  Nowhere is this more evident than in the family law arena.  Attorneys are increasingly developing and turning to nonlitigated forms of dispute...

By Rachel Virk
Category

How to Get Your Spouse to Agree to Mediation

How to Get Your Spouse to Agree to Mediation One of the initial challenges in mediation that you may face is getting your spouse on board to give it a...

By Leah Hadley

Find a Mediator

X
X
X