Jerry Barrett

Jerry Barrett

Jerome Barrett is the author of a History of ADR (Jossybass 2004), a history of SPIDR, and many papers and articles on USCS and FMCS as historian of FMCS. He is one of the 34 signers of the SPIDR Charter. Prior to the signing, he had been, on leave from FMCS, working with NCDS on community, racial and campus disputes, and had written two published article urging new area disputants to use the labor-management model to resolve their disputes.




Contact Jerry Barrett

Website: www.mediationhistory.org

Articles and Video:

Seeking Academic Help (05/03/17)
I’ve been thinking more urgently about getting scholars and others interested in using the scholarly FEMA collection, and in finding someone to continue the work of storing our mediation stories.

The Future of Alternative Dispute Resolution (12/09/14)
Given the creativity of ADR practitioners and scholars, the best of ADR will continue to grow and expand to new areas of practice, and unheard of new ADR practice will emerge.

FMCS History Archive Story (01/18/13)
This is the story of a career with FMCS. The FMCS historian tells of his career, successes and mistakes, and some of his most interesting experiences with the Federal Mediation and Conciliation Service. This story should be of interest for those new to the mediation field--it tells of the difficulties, the mundane, the struggle, the determination, the hope, and finally the reward of a career in the mediation field.

From Jerome Barrett (10/11/11)
Other promoters of ADR have made failed efforts to do what Mediate.com does so well and so comprehensively. I honor and admire your work, and I appreciate seeing some of my own writing under your flag. 400 issue, 1,400 authors -- wow

Labor-Management Lessons For The Larger ADR Community (11/23/09)
Labor-management mediation can claim an institutional history from 1913 to the present, almost a century of existence. Any organization with nearly 100 years of continuous existence with a full time staff of mediators, an extensive body of experience and training ought not to be ignored.

Early ADR in U.S. History: Talking versus War (02/12/07)
Most ADR practitioners would say that using ADR is always the preferred approach in dealing with conflict, and war or fighting is never, if ever, the first choice. They would argue that ADR or talking never kills anyone, whereas war always does. But aren’t there conflicts in which ADR works only after the parties have experienced war or fighting? Does the War of 1812 illustrate that?

Does the History of Our Field Matter to Us ADR Types? (11/27/06)
I have stood in lines, at SPIDR, ACR and other ADR events, listening to new ADR practitioners talking enthusiastically about their field, as if the field started the day they discovered it. They display no awareness of ADR’s long history. This blind spot, however, is not exclusive to the new arrivals. Many long time practitioners limit their knowledge of ADR history to their own personal history.