Maria Volpe

Maria Volpe

Maria R. Volpe, Ph.D. is Professor of Sociology, Director of the Dispute Resolution Program at John Jay College of Criminal Justice - City University of New York, and Director of the CUNY Dispute Resolution Center, a university-wide center focusing on dispute resolution research and innovative program development.

 An internationally known scholar, Dr. Volpe has lectured, researched, and written extensively about dispute resolution processes, particularly mediation, and has been widely recognized for her distinguished career in the field of dispute resolution, including the 2008 Lawrence Cooke Peace Innovator Award, 2008 Network for Peace Recognition, 2010 Association for Conflict Resolution of Greater New York Achievement Award, 2011 Frontline Champion Award, 2013 FamilyKind Recognition, 2014 Faculty Advisor of the Year, among others. In addition to teaching and research, she mediates conflicts in educational settings, conducts dispute resolution skills training, administers grant-funded projects, and facilitates for a wide range of groups. At John Jay College, she has created and facilitated town meetings, cops and kids dialogues, Muslim/Non-Muslim student dialogues, Black Jewish Dialogues, intergenerational dialogues, and Asian American student discussions. Since 9/11 she initiated the NYC-DR listserv, the monthly NYC-DR Roundtable Breakfast, and a variety of dispute resolution public awareness initiatives.




Contact Maria Volpe

Website: www.jjay.cuny.edu/faculty/maria-r-volpe

Articles and Video:

Mediation in the Future of Policing (11/08/16)
The future of policing must incorporate mediation. No other profession places its practitioners more in the middle of challenging situations; police officers are regularly expected to make difficult conversations work on the spot.

Conflict Resolvers' Responsibility To Shape the Message of Negotiation (02/23/16)
Trump tends to define negotiation as one-sided winning. With all of the knowledge and skills amassed over the years, conflict resolvers have a lot to contribute to the discussion about how negotiations work.