Martin Svatos

Martin Svatos

Dr. Martin Svatoš is a mediator and arbitrator based in Prague, Czech Republic. He has gained experience around the globe, having studied at the University of Sorbonne in Paris, at the Charles University in Prague and at the Cornell University. He has worked at the ICC and at the Chamber of Arbitration of Milan. He has participated in several international cases both in mediation and arbitration, especially in the central and eastern European region.

He is a lecturer at the Banking Institute/College of Banking in Prague (Czech Republic) and at the Seminar of European and Comparative Law in Urbino (Italy). He is a visiting professor at the Private Faculty of Law of the Catholic Institute of Toulouse (France). Martin has presented speeches at several international conferences, for instance at the World Forum of Mediation Centres.




Contact Martin Svatos

Website: www.forarb.com

Articles and Video:

WIN-WIN in Practice: Mediation Helping with Sports Disputes and Sports Disputes Helping Mediation (06/30/17)
Minor sport arbitration was heading towards rendering of an award which none of the parties would have been happy about.

And What is Your Biggest Achievement in Mediation? (04/24/15)
The MBB was founded in 2006 in order to promote mediation not only in the USA but also worldwide. Its main task is expressed in the following motto: “The only lasting peace is the one built by the disputants themselves.”

When the Mediators Pay the Highest Price (08/22/14)
Recent development in the Near East reminds how long and disastrous the Arabic-Israeli conflict is. Unfortunately, it has already claimed thousands of victims and every one of these tragedies could narrate a specific and sad story. One among them is especially important to be commemorated since it recounts a life and work of the first UN mediator who had saved thousands of prisoners in the Second World War and who was later killed carrying out his duties.

Mandatory Mediation Strikes Back (11/08/13)
The question of mandatory mediation is an interesting issue per se. According to some, the fundamental principles are at stake once discussing the forced attendance of parties in mediation procedure. The Italian legislator is obviously of different opinion having reintroduced the “mandatory mediation” to its legal system. One has to add – for the second time.