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Ken Johnson



Ken Johnson

Ken Johnson is a Collaborative Justice writer, lecturer and practitioner with former teaching experience (public and post-secondary), 15 years experience in the criminal justice system, certification from the Florida Supreme Court as a County Court Mediator and training in Restorative Justice from the College of Professional Studies at the University of West Florida.  In addition, he holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in Social Sciences from the University of West Florida and a Masters in Business Administration degree from Saint Leo University.  Ken Johnson is also the author of a soon to be released book called Unbroken CirclesSM for Schools:  Restoring Schools One Conflict at a Time.  For his good works, Ken was commissioned in 2005 as a Kentucky Colonel.  




Contact Ken Johnson

Website: kenjohnson.americasculturalist.tripod.com/home.html

Articles and Video:

The Good and Bad of Conflict (08/22/14)
As conflict professionals, we should strive to understand the subject of conflict in all its various forms. However, the large majority of the industry only desires to resolve conflict. Indeed, conflict can be beneficial (anabolic) or destructive (catabolic). Knowing the difference can give businesses and other organizations a catalystic edge to take them to the next level.

Workplace Violence - Part 2 (05/09/14)
From 9/11/2001 to 9/11/2013, approximately the same number of Americans died in the workplace due to violence as did American soldiers overseas fighting terrorists. Bullying, stress, domestic disputes, and other considerations account for this. Some researchers have suggested a new mental condition, similar to PSTD, called PTED, which workers may exhibit. Out of control catabolic (harmful) conflict poses a serious problem for both businesses and workers. This two-part series looks into this issue and suggests how ADR practitioners can work to better help businesses make the workplace safer and more productive.

Workplace Violence (05/02/14)
From 9/11/2001 to 9/11/2013, approximately the same amount of Americans died in the workplace due to violence as did American soldiers overseas fighting terrorists. Bullying, stress, domestic disputes, and other considerations account for this. Some researchers have suggested a new mental condition, similar to PSTD, called PTED which workers may exhibit. Out of control catabolic (harmful) conflict poses a serious problem for both businesses and workers. This two-part series looks into this issue and suggests how ADR practitioners can work with other various professionals to better help businesses make the workplace safer and more productive.

Collaborative Justice and the Changing World of Mediation (04/01/14)
The internet has made the world a much smaller place. As needs change, the world of ADR is constantly adapting to fill needs. American and UK-based forms of ADR used to be drastically different in their approach. However, the two are changing and adopting practices from across “the pond.” The author suggests that there is a movement among both American and UK ADR professionals towards Collaborative Justice where some issues are dealt with using Conflict Resolution practices while other situations may merit Conflict Transformation practices. Practices such as Collaborative Law and Expert Determination are merging with Transformative Mediation, Community Mediation, Victim-Offender Mediation (VOMA), juvenile panels, and others – essentially blurring the lines between the different modesl in an effort to handle issues of catabolic (harmful) conflict.

Behind Bars and Behind the Gun (11/04/13)
Behind bars and behind the gun: Answers for America's juvenile justice problem and catabolic ommunity-based conflicts. With a rise of deaths, abuse cases, and other atrocities in the Juvenile Justice System there has been questioning as to whether the present paradigm of understanding is the most appropriate solution available for handling issues of wrong behavior by adolescents. Ultimately, the author urges communities to become more involved in the justice system to urge Collaborative Justice-based solutions in juvenile justice issues.

A Collaborative Justice Approach to Bad Behavior in Tennessee Schools (08/13/13)
School violence has taken center stage in American debates as of late. The problem is that alternative solutions have proven to be impractical and costly. Other proposed solutions, based off mostly off of myths, actually may do more harm than good. In light of a federal investigation into Tennessee's juvenile justice practices, options are explored as to how one might make Tennessee's broken system better. A proposed solution is to use Collaborative Justice practices that merge traditional ADR with Restorative Justice techniques to make one unified practice. These proposed solutions have been well researched in used in school districts all over the world as well as the United State with greater than expected results.



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