Susan Yates

Susan Yates

Susan Yates has been Executive Director of Resolution Systems Institute (RSI) since 1997. In this role, she is responsible for implementing the organizational mission of improving the effectiveness of court-related alternative dispute resolution methods and for overall management of a national on-line Court ADR Resource Center, technical assistance to courts that are working to establish or improve their ADR programs, and monitoring and evaluation of court ADR programs.

As Executive Director, Ms. Yates assists state and federal courts throughout Illinois with their development of sound ADR programs. She uses her expertise and years of experience to help them navigate the complexities of program design, such as how to structure referral systems, how to deal with issues including confidentiality and neutrality, and how to ensure quality.

 




Contact Susan Yates

Website: blog.aboutrsi.org/

Articles and Video:

Mediators, Can We Shift Perspectives on the “Blind Men and the Elephant” Story? (08/11/17)
I have a problem with a story that we in the conflict resolution field use and I’m hoping we can find a replacement for it.

Mediation Shouldn’t Be More of a Barrier Than a Boon (05/12/17)
When it comes to defining mediation, I am not a strict constructionist.

Reflecting on RSI Focus Groups in Washington, DC (03/03/17)
My mediation skills, honed over many years, make it easy to shift into the role of focus group facilitator.

Family Law Arbitration Act (03/31/15)
People who have been involved with family law are likely to have encountered mediation, especially in child-related issues. But what about arbitration?

‘Tis the Season for Mediation (12/12/14)
In what has become an annual tradition, here is RSI’s seasonal parody of the Twelve Day of Christmas. Enjoy!

What Did Labor Day Teach Us About ADR? (09/12/14)
For a while in the evolution of the ADR field, when two neutrals met they would sometimes ask what the other’s “profession of origin” was. What they meant was, “what did you do before you were a mediator?” There were some unspoken questions packed in there, too. They wanted to know, are you a full-time neutral or are you really from some other profession and trying to break into this one?

“Hot-Tubbing” and ADR? (04/18/14)
Did you know there is an ADR process called “hot-tubbing?” This was news to me when I heard it mentioned last week at the Court ADR Symposium (which occurs every year on the day before the ABA Dispute Resolution Section Conference). As I understand it, the process is used sometimes in arbitration when there are conflicting expert opinions. Basically, the idea is that rather than simply hear expert testimony from each side sequentially, the arbitrator questions the experts concurrently.

Twelve Hours of Conflict (12/27/12)
For the first hour of conflict, my neutral gave to me a round table with a great view For the second hour of conflict, my neutral gave to me two succinct summaries And a round table with a great view

“Fairly Legal” Is Fairly Mundane (01/24/11)
I have a pretty high tolerance for mundane television. But, with months of buzz in the ADR community around Fairly Legal, a new show about a California mediator, I was not expecting mundane TV. Prior to last night’s pilot episode, the talk in ADR circles was about how television would treat mediation. Now we have seen it and I must say my main reaction was that this was standard uninspired and uninspiring TV. Even I had to make myself keep watching this show just to see how they dealt with mediation.

Hopes Becoming Reality: Law School Training Is Making Better ADR Advocates (10/25/10)
How many of us in the mediation field have said that educating people about alternative approaches to dispute resolution is essential to changing the way that conflicts are addressed? For those of us who work in court ADR, the continuing development of law school ADR coursework in particular is a cause for optimism that the practice of law increasingly will encompass skilled use of ADR.