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Conflict and Culture: A Literature Review and Bibliography (1992-1998 update)

by Stephen Garon, Michelle LeBaron,

Review by: The Alternative Newsletter Editor, James Boskey
Published by: The Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 22030-4444 (75pp 1998)

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When one thinks of comparative culture issues in dispute resolution, the first name that jumps out is that of Michelle LeBaron. Her research in the field has raised and addressed some of the most important questions relating to the effect of culture on disputing processes and on the applicability of models for resolution, and she has been consistently generous with her time, skill and knowledge assisting others in the field with need for her expertise.

About six years ago, while she was still at UVic in Canada, Michelle published a 174 page annotated bibliography on conflict and culture which selected the most important and useful works in the field and introduced them with a useful survey of the extant state of knowledge. Since that time, a great deal has been published in the area, much of it by Prof. LeBaron herself, and this volume updates that prior work.

Again, LeBaron provides a short but pithy summary of recent developments in the literature and then offers list of articles and a few books from a wide range of sources published since the prior list, grouped by topic and clearly and effectively annotated, with a note as to the intended audience, a brief synopsis of the item and a list of cross-reference terms that are applicable.

Few of us are as widely read in the area of culture and conflict as LeBaron and she has again very generously made a useful resource available to the field at large.

Stephen Garon

Michelle LeBaron is a tenured professor at the UBC law faculty and is Director of the UBC Program on Dispute Resolution. She joined the Faculty of Law in 2003 after twelve years teaching at the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution and the Women's Studies program at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia. From 1990-1993, she directed the Multiculturalism and Dispute Resolution Project at the University of Victoria. Professor LeBaron has lectured and consulted around the world on cross-cultural conflict resolution, and has practised as a family law and commercial mediator. She was called to the Bar of British Columbia in 1982 after articling at Campney and Murphy in Vancouver. Professor LeBaron has just completed a new book on conflict resolution across cultures with colleagues from six different countries, to be released in fall 2005 by Intercultural Press. She continues to pursue research into creativity, the arts and multiple ways of knowing as resources for bridging cultural differences.