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Google’s Resolution Process

by Colin Rule
October 2011

Novo Justice Blog by Colin Rule

Colin Rule

Much buzz this week in ODR circles about Google’s announced program for trusted stores.

Their resolutions component is welcome, though it seems a little thin – not sure how it will scale:

“In the situation that you have contacted the merchant, but were unable to reach a resolution about your eligible issue, you can get Google’s help.

When resolving an order issue, Google refers to the merchant’s policies and terms of service. Merchant’s policies can include items which may not be returned or cancelled, or must be returned before receiving the refund, restocking fees, return shipping fees, and cancellation fees. Please review the merchant’s policies prior to filing an issue.

Google’s process for resolving your issue is as follows:

You contacted or tried to contact the store, but were unable to resolve your eligible issue.
You contact Google through your Google Trusted Stores Customer account about the issue.
Google contacts the merchant with the details of your report.
At this point, a few things could happen:

You and the merchant agree upon a resolution:

The merchant will update the report in their Google Trusted Stores account and you’ll be notified of this via email. If you agree with the proposed resolution, the issue is closed.

You disagree with the proposed resolution:

You can let us know in your account by viewing the Order Details page for the order and clicking Issue is not resolved. The issue will escalate to Google for final resolution.

The merchant does not update the report in their account:

The issue will automatically escalate to Google for final resolution.

If the issue is escalated to Google, Google will follow this plan to determine a final resolution.“
I’ll try to learn more.

Biography


Colin Rule has worked at the intersection of technology and conflict resolution for the last two decades. He is CEO of Modria.com, an online dispute resolution service provider in Silicon Valley, and a non-resident Fellow at the Center for Internet and Society at Stanford Law School. From 2003 to 2011, he served as eBay and PayPal's first director of Online Dispute Resolution, designing and implementing systems that now resolve more than 60 million disputes each year. Mr. Rule is the author of Online Dispute Resolution for Business, published by Jossey-Bass in September 2002. He has presented and trained around the world for organizations including the U.S. Department of State, UNCITRAL, the International Chamber of Commerce, and the CPR Institute for Dispute Resolution, as well as teaching at UMass-Amherst, Stanford, Southern Methodist University, and Hastings College of the Law. He has written and been interviewed extensively about the Internet since 1999, with columns and articles appearing in ACResolution, Consensus, Dispute Resolution Magazine, and Peace Review. He holds a master's degree from Harvard University's Kennedy School of Government in conflict resolution and technology, a B.A. in peace studies from Haverford College, and he served as a Peace Corps volunteer in Eritrea from 1995-1997.



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Website: www.modria.com

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