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The 21st Century: It's All About Collaboration: Pick Up the Lawyers' Guide Today

by Victoria Pynchon
October 2008

From the IPADR blog of Victoria Pynchon, Les J. Weinstein, Eric Van Ginkel, Michael D. Young John J. McCaule yand John L. Wagner

Victoria Pynchon

The Lawyers' Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies

Say goodby to quill pens and obstreperous adversarial posturing.  Join authors Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell in learning "Smart Ways to Work Together" in their Lawyer's Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies.

If you're practicing intellectual property law (why else would you be reading this blog) you know that technology is moving faster than the speed of the law and that your own practice is often moving faster than any human being possibly could.  What can Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell help you do about it?  Here's what their new book's ABA blurb says it has in store for all of us:

This first-of-its-kind guide for the legal profession shows you how to use standard technology you already have and the latest "Web 2.0" resources and other tech tools, like Google Docs, Microsoft Office and SharePoint, and Adobe Acrobat, to work more effectively on projects with colleagues, clients, co-counsel and even opposing counsel. In The Lawyer's Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, well-known legal technology authorities Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell provides a wealth of information useful to lawyers who are just beginning to try these tools, as well as tips and techniques for those lawyers with intermediate and advanced collaboration experience.

Collaboration technologies and tools are the most important current developments in legal technology and are likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. Explained with minimal technical jargon, the book focuses on highly practical and usable ideas that you can put to work straight away.

With practical advice on how to use specific tools and concrete action steps to take, lawyers and law firms at all levels will benefit from working together better.

You'll learn:

* The basics of collaboration and collaboration tools

* How to select and implement tools and strategies

* The best ways to collaborate on documents, cases, transactions, and projects

* How to collaborate inside and outside the office

* How to collaborate using tools you already have or own


Technology now makes it easier than ever to work with others -- this is the first guide dedicated to the special requirements of the legal world with the practical steps it takes to do it right.

Far too often attorneys come to mediations and settlement conferences meeting one another for the very first time.  They have demonized one another, transmitted the satanic nature of the adversary to their clients -- who had already branded the opposition as cousin to the Bin Ladens -- and hope to work out a "deal" sufficiently satisfying to the parties that the clients are happy with the lawyers.

You'll litigate and settle all of your complex IP litigation far more quickly and efficiently with an attitude of collaboration and tools of cooperation.  The litigation will be less acrimonious and less expensive, making it far less likely that your clients will choose you as the next target of the lingering sense of injustice they have after some dimwit mediator splits the baby in half and hammers them to reluctantly accept a bad deal as the only alternative to an expensive and risky trial.

I can't express the value of Kennedy's and Mighell's book any better than did Patrick J. McKenna, author of Herding Cats, First Among Equals, and First 100 Days: Transitioning A New Managing Partner.

The 21st Century: It's All About Collaboration: Pick Up the Lawyers' Guide Today

The Lawyers' Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies

Say goodby to quill pens and obstreperous adversarial posturing.  Join authors Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell in learning "Smart Ways to Work Together" in their Lawyer's Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies.

If you're practicing intellectual property law (why else would you be reading this blog) you know that technology is moving faster than the speed of the law and that your own practice is often moving faster than any human being possibly could.  What can Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell help you do about it?  Here's what their new book's ABA blurb says it has in store for all of us:

This first-of-its-kind guide for the legal profession shows you how to use standard technology you already have and the latest "Web 2.0" resources and other tech tools, like Google Docs, Microsoft Office and SharePoint, and Adobe Acrobat, to work more effectively on projects with colleagues, clients, co-counsel and even opposing counsel. In The Lawyer's Guide to Collaboration Tools and Technologies: Smart Ways to Work Together, well-known legal technology authorities Dennis Kennedy and Tom Mighell provides a wealth of information useful to lawyers who are just beginning to try these tools, as well as tips and techniques for those lawyers with intermediate and advanced collaboration experience.

Collaboration technologies and tools are the most important current developments in legal technology and are likely to remain so for the foreseeable future. Explained with minimal technical jargon, the book focuses on highly practical and usable ideas that you can put to work straight away.

With practical advice on how to use specific tools and concrete action steps to take, lawyers and law firms at all levels will benefit from working together better.

You'll learn:

* The basics of collaboration and collaboration tools

* How to select and implement tools and strategies

* The best ways to collaborate on documents, cases, transactions, and projects

* How to collaborate inside and outside the office

* How to collaborate using tools you already have or own


Technology now makes it easier than ever to work with others -- this is the first guide dedicated to the special requirements of the legal world with the practical steps it takes to do it right.

Far too often attorneys come to mediations and settlement conferences meeting one another for the very first time.  They have demonized one another, transmitted the satanic nature of the adversary to their clients -- who had already branded the opposition as cousin to the Bin Ladens -- and hope to work out a "deal" sufficiently satisfying to the parties that the clients are happy with the lawyers.

You'll litigate and settle all of your complex IP litigation far more quickly and efficiently with an attitude of collaboration and tools of cooperation.  The litigation will be less acrimonious and less expensive, making it far less likely that your clients will choose you as the next target of the lingering sense of injustice they have after some dimwit mediator splits the baby in half and hammers them to reluctantly accept a bad deal as the only alternative to an expensive and risky trial.

I can't express the value of Kennedy's and Mighell's book any better than did Patrick J. McKenna, author of Herding Cats, First Among Equals, and First 100 Days: Transitioning A New Managing Partner.

There is an old adage that one can either work hard or work smart . . . you have a choice. And we would all choose working smart, but once having made that obvious decision, you then have to figure out how.

The good news is that Kennedy and Mighell have now produced the most comprehensive playbook, whether you are a solo, large law firm practitioner or working within a legal department, for how to choose and use the right technology tools to 'smartly' collaborate.

And for those who know that collaboration is a profoundly human endeavor, the authors identify all kinds of practical and cultural issues to watch for. This is one of those few texts that will be dog-eared throughout, for continued reference."

If you're still not convinced, here's the first chapter courtesy of the Kennedy, Mighell and the ABA.

Buy it.  Read it.  Catch your practice and your life up with the 21st Century.  Thrive.

Biography


Attorney-mediator Victoria Pynchon is a panelist with ADR Services, Inc. Ms. Pynchon was awarded her LL.M Degree in Dispute Resolution from the Straus Institute in May of 2006, after 25 years of complex commercial litigation practice, with sub-specialties in intellectual property, securities fraud, antitrust, insurance coverage, consumer class actions and all types of business torts and contract disputes.  During her two years of full-time neutral practice, she has co-mediated both mandatory and voluntary settlement conferences with Los Angeles Superior Court Judges Alexander Williams, III and Victoria Chaney.  As a result of her work with Judge Chaney in the Complex Court at Central Civil West, Ms. Pynchon has gained significant experience mediating construction defect litigation.  Ms. Pynchon received her J.D., Order of the Coif, from the U.C. Davis School of Law. 



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Website: www.settlenow.com

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