What’s In It For Us?

by Constantin-Adi Gavrila
August 2016

Kluwer Mediation Blog

Constantin-Adi Gavrila

I practice, teach and preach mediation for the past fifteen years and whenever I would introduce myself as a mediator the vast majority of people would still have confusions, if not difficulties, in having a clear representation of WHO a mediator is, WHAT is it that a mediator aims to achieve, for WHOM, WHAT he or she does, and maybe more importantly, IF, WHEN and WHY would someone benefit from using mediation and mediators. It seems that we are successfully failing to send the message across as most people, companies and governments don’t really understand, respect, accept and use mediation.

I recently had an informal meeting with representatives of a company and we discussed about the quality of their communication with members of the communities that live in the company’s area of operation. The company’s project has significant social and environmental impacts in the surrounding communities. In short, after introducing myself as a mediator, I was told that the company never used mediation – because we never needed it, they said. And then I asked How do you know when you need it? and the answer said it all –we invited community members to our offices and they’ve never started to shout. Later in the conversation, the remaining question was “We would use mediation … but what’s in it for us?”.

Just like Bill Ury said, that was the sound of a human mind opening. An excellent chat followed. It was not only the company reps that were open to what I had to say about it. I was equally open, as I came (one more time) to the realization of the fact that using mediation is for companies and other users just a business decision – no more than that – that will have to be supported by a pragmatic approach. Before anything, the companies will put mediation on their agenda when mediation will become part of the business plan as a possible tool to enhance dialogue, to open communication channels or to manage risks effectively.

We may look sometimes at the demand side as it was something wrong with the way that it looks at mediation and that more information would enlighten potential users to the point of a better understanding, respect and acceptance for third party intervention. This may be true, probably more information is useful, but not entirely I suspect. However, we equally need to pay attention to the ourselves and to the message that we send across and what kind of information we are preaching. It may be that we are too seduced by our arguments and that we are too subjective to sing our own mantra. It may be that the most effective language can be learned from users that successfully tried mediation and that have the needed objectiveness that we actually seek in any recommendation.

The Global Pound Conference series of conferences offers a genuine opportunity for users, current and more importantly potential, to step forward and speak about these things in a way that would inspire providers, advisors and influencers to progress the dispute resolution field, improve access to justice and finally, would inspire more users to give their own answers to the question – What’s In It For Us?

 

Biography


Constantin-Adi Gavrila, is mediator and mediation trainer, cofounder and general manager of the Craiova Mediation Center Association, first president of the Romanian Mediation Centers Union and first vice-president of the Romanian Mediation Council. He was honored with the Association for Conflict Resolution (ACR) International Development Committee’s 2009 Outstanding Leadership Award for outstanding contributions to international conflict resolution.

He mediates cases of all types including commercial, family and real estate, taking a practical and business-oriented approach to dispute resolution. With over ten years of experience as mediator, he is able to quickly grasp the central issue in dispute, using creative approaches to help parties solve seemingly intractable problems.

Mr. Gavrila coordinated as general manager extended programs in mediation: participation at the legislature process in the mediation field, training of mediators, systems development, and information dissemination. He is an IMI certified mediator, a JAMS International panelist, a Mediate.Com author, a Kluwer Mediation Blog contributor and a member of the Independent Standards Commission convened by the International Mediation Institute (IMI).



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